archatlas:

45th World Wide SketchCrawl - DC rcruzniemiec aka archatlas
After many (MANY) years of not doing any street sketching I participated today on the 45th World Wide SketchCrawl - DC. Every drawing took me longer than usual and just getting the cobwebs off took at least a couple of tries but I dare to show a couple of the sketches done today at Eastern Market. archatlas:

45th World Wide SketchCrawl - DC rcruzniemiec aka archatlas
After many (MANY) years of not doing any street sketching I participated today on the 45th World Wide SketchCrawl - DC. Every drawing took me longer than usual and just getting the cobwebs off took at least a couple of tries but I dare to show a couple of the sketches done today at Eastern Market. archatlas:

45th World Wide SketchCrawl - DC rcruzniemiec aka archatlas
After many (MANY) years of not doing any street sketching I participated today on the 45th World Wide SketchCrawl - DC. Every drawing took me longer than usual and just getting the cobwebs off took at least a couple of tries but I dare to show a couple of the sketches done today at Eastern Market.

archatlas:

45th World Wide SketchCrawl - DC rcruzniemiec aka archatlas

After many (MANY) years of not doing any street sketching I participated today on the 45th World Wide SketchCrawl - DC. Every drawing took me longer than usual and just getting the cobwebs off took at least a couple of tries but I dare to show a couple of the sketches done today at Eastern Market.

philamuseum:

Staff Pick: Well hello, you.

Man in Costume,” 1861, France(?)

archiemcphee:

For a wonderfully eerie ongoing project entitled Ghost Photographs American artist Angela Deane alters found photos, turning people into anonymous phantoms. The results range from amusing and delightful to wistful and melancholy. Deane’s painted snapshots reveal that ghosts go on vacation, attend prom and even go trick-or-treating. They have parties and gather to watch ballgames. It turns out that ghosts are just like the rest of us and we’re all ghosts ourselves.

"These ghosts are the ghosts of moments, of days, of experiences. With the specifics of identity obscured by paint I like to imagine it’s as if you and I can partake in the memory, share in the experience, allow the snapshot to seem familiar. Let’s share some memories, shall we?"

To view many more images from this haunting series follow Angela Deane here on Tumblr at ghostphotographs. Prints are available by contacting Deane through her personal website.
[via Junkculture and CreativeReview] archiemcphee:

For a wonderfully eerie ongoing project entitled Ghost Photographs American artist Angela Deane alters found photos, turning people into anonymous phantoms. The results range from amusing and delightful to wistful and melancholy. Deane’s painted snapshots reveal that ghosts go on vacation, attend prom and even go trick-or-treating. They have parties and gather to watch ballgames. It turns out that ghosts are just like the rest of us and we’re all ghosts ourselves.

"These ghosts are the ghosts of moments, of days, of experiences. With the specifics of identity obscured by paint I like to imagine it’s as if you and I can partake in the memory, share in the experience, allow the snapshot to seem familiar. Let’s share some memories, shall we?"

To view many more images from this haunting series follow Angela Deane here on Tumblr at ghostphotographs. Prints are available by contacting Deane through her personal website.
[via Junkculture and CreativeReview] archiemcphee:

For a wonderfully eerie ongoing project entitled Ghost Photographs American artist Angela Deane alters found photos, turning people into anonymous phantoms. The results range from amusing and delightful to wistful and melancholy. Deane’s painted snapshots reveal that ghosts go on vacation, attend prom and even go trick-or-treating. They have parties and gather to watch ballgames. It turns out that ghosts are just like the rest of us and we’re all ghosts ourselves.

"These ghosts are the ghosts of moments, of days, of experiences. With the specifics of identity obscured by paint I like to imagine it’s as if you and I can partake in the memory, share in the experience, allow the snapshot to seem familiar. Let’s share some memories, shall we?"

To view many more images from this haunting series follow Angela Deane here on Tumblr at ghostphotographs. Prints are available by contacting Deane through her personal website.
[via Junkculture and CreativeReview] archiemcphee:

For a wonderfully eerie ongoing project entitled Ghost Photographs American artist Angela Deane alters found photos, turning people into anonymous phantoms. The results range from amusing and delightful to wistful and melancholy. Deane’s painted snapshots reveal that ghosts go on vacation, attend prom and even go trick-or-treating. They have parties and gather to watch ballgames. It turns out that ghosts are just like the rest of us and we’re all ghosts ourselves.

"These ghosts are the ghosts of moments, of days, of experiences. With the specifics of identity obscured by paint I like to imagine it’s as if you and I can partake in the memory, share in the experience, allow the snapshot to seem familiar. Let’s share some memories, shall we?"

To view many more images from this haunting series follow Angela Deane here on Tumblr at ghostphotographs. Prints are available by contacting Deane through her personal website.
[via Junkculture and CreativeReview] archiemcphee:

For a wonderfully eerie ongoing project entitled Ghost Photographs American artist Angela Deane alters found photos, turning people into anonymous phantoms. The results range from amusing and delightful to wistful and melancholy. Deane’s painted snapshots reveal that ghosts go on vacation, attend prom and even go trick-or-treating. They have parties and gather to watch ballgames. It turns out that ghosts are just like the rest of us and we’re all ghosts ourselves.

"These ghosts are the ghosts of moments, of days, of experiences. With the specifics of identity obscured by paint I like to imagine it’s as if you and I can partake in the memory, share in the experience, allow the snapshot to seem familiar. Let’s share some memories, shall we?"

To view many more images from this haunting series follow Angela Deane here on Tumblr at ghostphotographs. Prints are available by contacting Deane through her personal website.
[via Junkculture and CreativeReview] archiemcphee:

For a wonderfully eerie ongoing project entitled Ghost Photographs American artist Angela Deane alters found photos, turning people into anonymous phantoms. The results range from amusing and delightful to wistful and melancholy. Deane’s painted snapshots reveal that ghosts go on vacation, attend prom and even go trick-or-treating. They have parties and gather to watch ballgames. It turns out that ghosts are just like the rest of us and we’re all ghosts ourselves.

"These ghosts are the ghosts of moments, of days, of experiences. With the specifics of identity obscured by paint I like to imagine it’s as if you and I can partake in the memory, share in the experience, allow the snapshot to seem familiar. Let’s share some memories, shall we?"

To view many more images from this haunting series follow Angela Deane here on Tumblr at ghostphotographs. Prints are available by contacting Deane through her personal website.
[via Junkculture and CreativeReview] archiemcphee:

For a wonderfully eerie ongoing project entitled Ghost Photographs American artist Angela Deane alters found photos, turning people into anonymous phantoms. The results range from amusing and delightful to wistful and melancholy. Deane’s painted snapshots reveal that ghosts go on vacation, attend prom and even go trick-or-treating. They have parties and gather to watch ballgames. It turns out that ghosts are just like the rest of us and we’re all ghosts ourselves.

"These ghosts are the ghosts of moments, of days, of experiences. With the specifics of identity obscured by paint I like to imagine it’s as if you and I can partake in the memory, share in the experience, allow the snapshot to seem familiar. Let’s share some memories, shall we?"

To view many more images from this haunting series follow Angela Deane here on Tumblr at ghostphotographs. Prints are available by contacting Deane through her personal website.
[via Junkculture and CreativeReview] archiemcphee:

For a wonderfully eerie ongoing project entitled Ghost Photographs American artist Angela Deane alters found photos, turning people into anonymous phantoms. The results range from amusing and delightful to wistful and melancholy. Deane’s painted snapshots reveal that ghosts go on vacation, attend prom and even go trick-or-treating. They have parties and gather to watch ballgames. It turns out that ghosts are just like the rest of us and we’re all ghosts ourselves.

"These ghosts are the ghosts of moments, of days, of experiences. With the specifics of identity obscured by paint I like to imagine it’s as if you and I can partake in the memory, share in the experience, allow the snapshot to seem familiar. Let’s share some memories, shall we?"

To view many more images from this haunting series follow Angela Deane here on Tumblr at ghostphotographs. Prints are available by contacting Deane through her personal website.
[via Junkculture and CreativeReview] archiemcphee:

For a wonderfully eerie ongoing project entitled Ghost Photographs American artist Angela Deane alters found photos, turning people into anonymous phantoms. The results range from amusing and delightful to wistful and melancholy. Deane’s painted snapshots reveal that ghosts go on vacation, attend prom and even go trick-or-treating. They have parties and gather to watch ballgames. It turns out that ghosts are just like the rest of us and we’re all ghosts ourselves.

"These ghosts are the ghosts of moments, of days, of experiences. With the specifics of identity obscured by paint I like to imagine it’s as if you and I can partake in the memory, share in the experience, allow the snapshot to seem familiar. Let’s share some memories, shall we?"

To view many more images from this haunting series follow Angela Deane here on Tumblr at ghostphotographs. Prints are available by contacting Deane through her personal website.
[via Junkculture and CreativeReview] archiemcphee:

For a wonderfully eerie ongoing project entitled Ghost Photographs American artist Angela Deane alters found photos, turning people into anonymous phantoms. The results range from amusing and delightful to wistful and melancholy. Deane’s painted snapshots reveal that ghosts go on vacation, attend prom and even go trick-or-treating. They have parties and gather to watch ballgames. It turns out that ghosts are just like the rest of us and we’re all ghosts ourselves.

"These ghosts are the ghosts of moments, of days, of experiences. With the specifics of identity obscured by paint I like to imagine it’s as if you and I can partake in the memory, share in the experience, allow the snapshot to seem familiar. Let’s share some memories, shall we?"

To view many more images from this haunting series follow Angela Deane here on Tumblr at ghostphotographs. Prints are available by contacting Deane through her personal website.
[via Junkculture and CreativeReview]

archiemcphee:

For a wonderfully eerie ongoing project entitled Ghost Photographs American artist Angela Deane alters found photos, turning people into anonymous phantoms. The results range from amusing and delightful to wistful and melancholy. Deane’s painted snapshots reveal that ghosts go on vacation, attend prom and even go trick-or-treating. They have parties and gather to watch ballgames. It turns out that ghosts are just like the rest of us and we’re all ghosts ourselves.

"These ghosts are the ghosts of moments, of days, of experiences. With the specifics of identity obscured by paint I like to imagine it’s as if you and I can partake in the memory, share in the experience, allow the snapshot to seem familiar. Let’s share some memories, shall we?"

To view many more images from this haunting series follow Angela Deane here on Tumblr at ghostphotographs. Prints are available by contacting Deane through her personal website.

[via Junkculture and CreativeReview]

…a true friend is hard to find, don’t you mind people grinnin in your face.

historynet:

The military would use Betty Grable’s pin up’s to teach soldiers how to read maps during WWII 1942 [345 × 418]

historynet:

The military would use Betty Grable’s pin up’s to teach soldiers how to read maps during WWII 1942 [345 × 418]

todaysdocument:

Doors of Monumental Proportions
The massive bronze doors of the National Archives first opened on October 18, 1935 (which also happens to fall in the middle of American Archives Month!).

If you have ever visited the National Archives in Washington, DC, you may have noticed two very, very large bronze doors that mark the original Constitution Avenue entrance to the building. Visitors enter through the Constitution Avenue entrance to view the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Bill of Rights as well as the many other exhibits the National Archives Museum offers.
These bronze doors stand about 37 feet, 7 inches high and are 10 feet wide and 11 inches thick. Each weighs roughly 6.5 tons. The building’s architect, John Russell Pope, understanding the national significance of the structure, sought to design a public exhibition hall of monumental proportions. As a reminder to visitors of the importance of the building’s purpose, the public exhibition hall Pope designed—the rotunda—measures 75 feet high; the bronze doors leading into the exhibition hall match that in size and character.
The doors were first opened on October 18, 1935. Then visitors to the National Archives climbed up 39 steps on Constitution Avenue and walked past two rows of giant Corinthian columns before passing through the large, motorized doors. Each morning, guards opened the doors by turning a key to slide them open. In the evening, the guards would close them for the night. Just past the bronze doors are another, smaller set of doors that kept out the elements.

For 65 years, visitors walked through these stunning doors to visit National Archives exhibits. When the Archives reopened in 2003 following a two-year renovation, the bronze doors remained closed. Visitors now enter on the sidewalk level of Constitution Avenue. While the bronze doors are now opened only on special occasions, they remain a notable feature of the building and continue to remind visitors of the significance of the National Archives and its work.

via Prologue: Pieces of History » Doors of Monumental Proportions todaysdocument:

Doors of Monumental Proportions
The massive bronze doors of the National Archives first opened on October 18, 1935 (which also happens to fall in the middle of American Archives Month!).

If you have ever visited the National Archives in Washington, DC, you may have noticed two very, very large bronze doors that mark the original Constitution Avenue entrance to the building. Visitors enter through the Constitution Avenue entrance to view the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Bill of Rights as well as the many other exhibits the National Archives Museum offers.
These bronze doors stand about 37 feet, 7 inches high and are 10 feet wide and 11 inches thick. Each weighs roughly 6.5 tons. The building’s architect, John Russell Pope, understanding the national significance of the structure, sought to design a public exhibition hall of monumental proportions. As a reminder to visitors of the importance of the building’s purpose, the public exhibition hall Pope designed—the rotunda—measures 75 feet high; the bronze doors leading into the exhibition hall match that in size and character.
The doors were first opened on October 18, 1935. Then visitors to the National Archives climbed up 39 steps on Constitution Avenue and walked past two rows of giant Corinthian columns before passing through the large, motorized doors. Each morning, guards opened the doors by turning a key to slide them open. In the evening, the guards would close them for the night. Just past the bronze doors are another, smaller set of doors that kept out the elements.

For 65 years, visitors walked through these stunning doors to visit National Archives exhibits. When the Archives reopened in 2003 following a two-year renovation, the bronze doors remained closed. Visitors now enter on the sidewalk level of Constitution Avenue. While the bronze doors are now opened only on special occasions, they remain a notable feature of the building and continue to remind visitors of the significance of the National Archives and its work.

via Prologue: Pieces of History » Doors of Monumental Proportions

todaysdocument:

Doors of Monumental Proportions

The massive bronze doors of the National Archives first opened on October 18, 1935 (which also happens to fall in the middle of American Archives Month!).

If you have ever visited the National Archives in Washington, DC, you may have noticed two very, very large bronze doors that mark the original Constitution Avenue entrance to the building. Visitors enter through the Constitution Avenue entrance to view the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Bill of Rights as well as the many other exhibits the National Archives Museum offers.

These bronze doors stand about 37 feet, 7 inches high and are 10 feet wide and 11 inches thick. Each weighs roughly 6.5 tons. The building’s architect, John Russell Pope, understanding the national significance of the structure, sought to design a public exhibition hall of monumental proportions. As a reminder to visitors of the importance of the building’s purpose, the public exhibition hall Pope designed—the rotunda—measures 75 feet high; the bronze doors leading into the exhibition hall match that in size and character.

The doors were first opened on October 18, 1935. Then visitors to the National Archives climbed up 39 steps on Constitution Avenue and walked past two rows of giant Corinthian columns before passing through the large, motorized doors. Each morning, guards opened the doors by turning a key to slide them open. In the evening, the guards would close them for the night. Just past the bronze doors are another, smaller set of doors that kept out the elements.

For 65 years, visitors walked through these stunning doors to visit National Archives exhibits. When the Archives reopened in 2003 following a two-year renovation, the bronze doors remained closed. Visitors now enter on the sidewalk level of Constitution Avenue. While the bronze doors are now opened only on special occasions, they remain a notable feature of the building and continue to remind visitors of the significance of the National Archives and its work.

via Prologue: Pieces of History » Doors of Monumental Proportions

luzfosca:

Photographer Unknown

The first car which entered the Yosemite National Park in 1900.

source